Dumb and Dumber

By: Jane Wells
On: Wells Street

One of the funny things about being human is that no matter how successful we are, we always end up doing something stupid. I prove this point hourly. The hope is that over time we learn from our mistakes and don’t repeat them.

But who am I kidding?

So let’s get to it! Here’s a summary of dumb moves from Wall Street to Main Street to Tokyo. Read more

The (Next) Great Migration

By: Here Comes Everybody Podcast
On: The Solo Project

“The great thing about this migration is the ability for reinvention. And the ability for reinvention is directly tied to innovation and entrepreneurship.”

Kotkin has written about every conceivable form of entrepreneurship. He is, in fact, a career soloist himself.

These days, it seems that everyone — and in particular soloists — are moving somewhere.

In this episode, Kotkin tells us exactly where we’re going — and why.

 

Related:

Buy Joel’s latest book, The Coming of Neo-Feudalism
The Politics of Migration: From Blue to Red
The Emergence of the Global Heartland

Joel Kotkin talks with John Anderson on Neo Feudalism and the New Ruling Class

By: John Anderson
On: John Anderson Direct

In this Direct interview, Joel Kotkin joins John to discuss some of the key theses of Joel’s widely-praised recent book, ‘The Coming of Neo-Feudalism’.

Joel shines the spotlight on the Western progressive elite or, as he terms them, the ‘new clerisy’, who sideline and silence anyone who speak or, increasingly, think against the orthodoxy. He paints a worrying comparison between this status quo, the Chinese experience of authoritarianism and the medieval feudalism known to Europe for hundreds of years.

 

 

Related:

Buy The Coming of Neo-Feudalism
Winners and Losers: The Global Economy After COVID
Fully Oligarchic Luxury Socialism
China’s Urban Crisis
China’s Troubled Urban Future

John Anderson, former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, interviewing the world’s foremost thought leaders about today’s pressing social, cultural and political issues.

The American Renaissance Has Begun

By: David Brooks
Appearing in: The New York Times

Americans are searching for ways to make more money while living more connected lives. Joel Kotkin, a professor of urban studies at Chapman University, points out that as the U.S. population disperses, economic and cultural gaps between coastal cities and inland communities will most likely shrink. And, he says, as more and more immigrants settle in rural areas and small towns, their presence might reduce nativism and increase economic competitiveness.

Read more

Joel Kotkin talks with Rod Arquette About How the Pandemic Changes Workplace

By: Rod Arquette
On: The Rod Arquette Show Daily Rundown

Joel Kotkin joins the Rod Arquette show for a conversation about his recent piece about how the pandemic will change the workplace in America.

 

 

Related:

How Work Will Permanently Change After the Pandemic
Winners and Losers: The Global Economy After COVID

Joel Kotkin talks about the middle class rebellion against progressives, with Jamil Jivani

Host: Jamil Jivani
On: Jamil Jivani Show on Omny

Joel Kotkin talks with Jamil about the middle class rebellion against progressives that’s gaining steam.

Click to play the audio:

Related:

A Middle Class Rebellion Against Progressives is Gaining Steam

Woke Boardroom Preening a Threat to Democracy?

By: Adam Creighton
In: The Australian

A former FBI deputy director resigned from Airbnb after raising concerns that the popular online holiday booking platform was sharing customer data with the Chinese government.

Joel Kotkin, an insightful Californian academic at Chapman University who has written seven books on social demography, believes woke capital is making the West more like China. Read more

There’s an Exodus From the ‘Star Cities,’ and I Have Good News and Bad News

By: Thomas B. Edsall
In: New York Times

When it comes to the fate of big cities in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, there are two sets of overlapping economic and political consequences, but they are not necessarily what you might expect.

Declining tax revenues, business closures, spiking rates of violent crime and an exodus to smaller communities have left major urban centers anxious about surviving the pandemic’s aftermath and returning to a new normal.

But all is not lost.

In a paper published earlier this month, “America’s Post-Pandemic Geography, two urbanists who come from very different political perspectives, Richard Florida, a professor at the University of Toronto, and Joel Kotkin, a professor at Chapman University, argue:

Any shift away from superstar cities may augur a long-overdue and much-needed geographic recalibration of America’s innovation economy. High-tech industries have come to be massively concentrated — some would say overconcentrated — in coastal elite cities and tech hubs. The San Francisco Bay Area and the Acela Corridor (spanning Boston, New York, and Washington, D.C.) have accounted for about three-quarters of all venture-capital investment in high-tech start-ups. In the decade and a half leading up to the pandemic, more than 90 percent of employment growth in America’s innovation economy was concentrated in just five major coastal metros: San Francisco, San Jose, Seattle, San Diego, and Boston, according to the Brookings Institution.

In addition, Florida and Kotkin write:

The current shift to remote work makes geographic rebalancing of these industries more feasible, and a number of leading big tech companies have openly embraced it. Such a rebalancing might help not only smaller cities develop more robust economies but also take some pressure off the housing and real-estate markets of superstar cities and tech hubs, making them more affordable.

Read the rest of this piece at New York Times.

Related:

America’s Post-Pandemic Geography
The Geography of COVID-19
Could COVID Exodus Speed the Heartland Revival?

Is Congress Ready to Invest in Regional Economies?

By: Alan Greenblatt
In: Governing

A few parts of the country have made out like bandits in recent years. In the decade between the Great Recession and the pandemic plunge, 90 percent of the job growth in technology and innovation sectors occurred in just five major metropolitan areas. In any given year, roughly 80 percent of the nation’s venture capital funding flows to just three states: California, Massachusetts and New York. The pandemic didn’t change that.

Read more

Joel Kotkin talks about what happened to social democracy, with Amanda Vanstone

Host: Amanda Vanstone
On: Counterpoint

What happened to social democracy? Joel Kotkin reminds us that it was born of the radical Left in Marx’s own time, social democrats worked, sometimes with remarkable success, to improve the living standards of working people by accommodating the virtues of capitalism. Now, he says that in its place, we find a kind of progressivism that focuses on gender, sexual preference, race, and climate change. He takes us through the history of social democracy to today’s progressives and says that arguably the single greatest distinction between social democracy and the new progressivism lies in the word ‘agency’. The original social democrats sought to enhance their economic power by mobilizing grassroots support. In contrast, today’s Left tends to favour rule by experts. They have a preference for censorship and the political repression of uncooperative political tendencies. How did this happen and why?

Click to play the audio: