Ten years After Lehman Collapsed, We’re Still Screwed

This article first appeared at The Daily Beast.

The collapse of Lehman Brothers 10 years ago today began the financial crisis that crippled and even killed for some the American dream as we had known it. Donald Trump might be starting to change that, at least for Americans who aren’t determined to remain in our bluest and priciest cities. Read more

A Generation Plans An Exodus From California

California is the great role model for America, particularly if you read the Eastern press. Yet few boosters have yet to confront the fact that the state is continuing to hemorrhage people at a higher rate, Read more

The West Is In the Midst of a Migration and Identity Crisis

Excerpted from an article that first appeared at The Orange County Register.

As the economy has improved, popular concern, both here and abroad, has shifted to issues of migration and identity. Just last year, immigration, according to Gallup, was seen as the most important issue by barely 5 percent of the population, while the economy was cited by more than four times as many. But now, immigration and undocumented aliens is now the biggest concern to 15 percent of the population, equal to that of the economy.

You can blame Donald Trump, and his focus on that issue, for some of this. But Trump did not create the long mounting migration pressures — including 200,000 unaccompanied children during President Obama’s last term. Nor is he responsible for growing opposition — almost three-to-one — to mass migration among Europeans.

Unrestricted EU migration helped drive Brexit in the U.K., upended Italian politics and sent many traditionally centrist voters elsewhere flocking to anti-immigrant parties, including some on the extreme, quasi-fascist right. The move towards what the Guardian ominously calls “fortress Europe” could even dethrone the current queen of the EU, the much praised “great humanist,” Angela Merkel.

Read the entire piece at The Orange County Register.


Joel Kotkin is the Roger Hobbs Distinguished Fellow in Urban Studies at Chapman University and executive director of the Houston-based Center for Opportunity Urbanism. His newest book, The Human City: Urbanism for the rest of us, was published in April by Agate. He is also author of The New Class Conflict, The City: A Global History, and The Next Hundred Million: America in 2050. He is executive director of NewGeography.com and lives in Orange County, CA.

Photo: Elekes Andor [CC BY-SA 4.0 ], from Wikimedia Commons

Patriarchy or No, it’s Good to Have Dad Around on Father’s Day

Excerpted from an article that first appeared at The Orange County Register

This Father’s Day takes place amid growing assault on what is widely called “patriarchy.” In the era of #MeToo-inspired militant feminism, it’s become increasingly fashionable to reject maleness and castigate fatherhood, as largely irrelevant and even damaging. Read more

The Fight For Our Future Belongs to the ‘Burbs

This piece first appeared on The Daily Beast.

Look away from President Trump and it’s easier to see how three long-term demographic and geographic trends are reshaping American politics. Read more

The Cities Creating The Most White-Collar Jobs, 2018

by Joel Kotkin and Dr. Michael Shires

Professional and business services have long been identified with the downtowns of cities like New York, Chicago and San Francisco, where lawyers, accountants and architects are thick on the ground. However, in recent years there’s been a clear shift in the geography of this vital sector, with some of the strongest job generation emerging far from the high-rise canyons. Read more

Where U.S. Manufacturing is Thriving, 2018

by Joel Kotkin and Dr. Michael Shires

The ‘80s futurist John Naisbitt once called manufacturing a “a declining sport,” and to be sure the share of Americans working in factories has fallen far from the 1950 peak of 30% to roughly 8.5% last year.

Yet, manufacturing’s contributions to the economy are far out of proportion to its shrinking share of employment. Read more

Growth in America is Tilting Toward Smaller Cities

Excerpted from an article that first appeared at Forbes.com

We are often told that America’s future lies in our big cities. That may no longer be entirely true. Some of the strongest job creation and population growth is now occurring in cities of 1 million people or less. Read more

Finance Flies West, and South

This article first appeared at City Journal.

The recently announced departure of New York City-based Alliance Bernstein for Nashville, taking more than 1,000 jobs with it, suggests a potential loosening of New York’s iron grip on the financial-services industry. Yet the move reflects a longer evolution that has seen financial firms leave not only New York but also other traditional centers—what one historian calls the “Yankee Empire”—that for two centuries dominated banking, insurance, and investment capital. Read more

Where Talent Wants to Live

Excerpted from an article that first appeared at Chief Executive.

With unemployment down and wages rising, there’s growing concern that a lengthy and potentially crippling talent shortage will sweep the U.S. Addressing this could become a critical issue for businesses competing with Asian and European firms facing similar and, in many ways, more severe shortages.

Read more